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Second Season
#100 The Carretera Austral in 10 minutes

Take a journey with us down Chile’s famous Carretera Austral. This stunning road trip is 770 miles long, passing through beautiful forest, quaint villages, and untouched landscapes on its route from Puerto Montt to Villa O’Higgins at the edge of Chilean Patagonia.

#99 Villa Lucia in Cartagena

The seaside resort of Cartagena has hosted various artists and among them one made a little architectural jewel: Villa Lucia is a miniature replica of a Tuscan villa in the central coast. Commissioned by Italian immigrants, the painter and writer Adolfo Couve rescued it from oblivion and spent his last years in this mansion.

#98 Organ

“In Chile there are approximately 120 organs in total including the smaller ones.However, there are only a few like this, with three keyboards and this many tubes,” explains Christian Sundt, organist at the historical Saint Paul’s Church in Valparaíso. The church’s organ dates back to 1903, designed specifically for the ornate space. Discover the craftsmanship that goes into creating this massive instrument, and the skills it takes to make it sing.

#97 Luthiers

“Each instrument brings a surprise,” says artisan luthier Máximo López. Touring his workshop we find all different kinds of instruments, hand made from carefully selected wood. Fascinated by music and instruments since he was a child, López has accumulated a talent and a vast collection. A lover of the art and the music, he cares for each of his creations. ”I guess if you asked me which is my favorite, I’d have to say I still haven’t decided,” López admits.

#96 Galleries

“The center of Santiago is unique honestly because it contains these quality urban spaces with amenities that mean you can stay and spend time here, relaxed,” says architect José Rosas.
Rosas takes us through the galleries designed especially for the Chilean capital, walking us through their history and explaing what role they play in this bustling metropolis.

#95 Absinthe – Living Atlas Chile

“At one point, absinthe used to have something of a black legend about it, that it led to insanity, to ‘absinthism,’” says master distiller Eric Caballero.
So what goes into this legendary brew? Find out the myths and facts behind this famous concoction and how indigenous traditions have made this drink especially Chilean.

#94 River neighborhood

In the picturesque riverside city of Valdivia, architects are getting creative- desiging floating neighborhoods that are both environmentally friendly, convenient, and fun! Discover how these ingenius individuals are avoiding the traffic and bustle of the city through innovative tecniques and a love of the river that defines the city.

#93 Magic

“What we dedicate ourselves to is illusionism, creating a different reality in the minds of these people,” says magician Mirko Peric.
Learn his tricks and those of his fellow magicians in the Magic Circle of Concepción and why they are drawn to this creative and entertaining passed time.

#92 Apitherapy

Bees are known to be an intricate and incredibly important part of our world, but did you know they could also have the power to heal us? One of the first practitioners of apitherapy in Chile, Nelson explains how the sting of a bee can actually have healing properties for humans.
“Theoretically they could be used to treat everything… if it’s employed early on, it cures,” Correa says.

#91 The Vicaría de Solidaridad

Created by Cardinal Raúl Silva Henríquez, the Vicaría de Solidaridad monitored human rights issues and provided support for victims of violence for almost twenty years. ”Our job is focused on collaborating in the process of truth, justice, reparation and reconciliation,” says María Paz Vergara, thee foundation’s executive secretary for the documentation and archives of the Vicaría de la Solidaridad. Today their research and the database they collected remains a key resource for many trials dating back to the 70s and 80s.
Explore the archives of this monument for human rights work with the latest from Living Atlas Chile.

#90 Port of San Antonio

Go inside one of Chile’s largest ports – the port of San Antonio – which has been connecting Chile to the world since 1911. A marvel of industry and technology, workers here move thousands of shipments in and out of the port each week. Learn how they do it and discover the history of this important gateway.

#89 Adobe

Many of the timeless homes and estates in Chile were constructed out of hand-crafted adobe bricks. The recipe for this traditional material requires the perfect balance of clay, straw, and know-how. Follow master adobe maker José Sepúlveda and learn the secrets behind this classic building block.

#88 Mural of Latin America at the Universidad de Concepción

A gift of the Mexican government in the 1960s, the famous artist Jorge González Camarena created this remarkable mural recounting the unity between Latin American peoples and cultures across the long history of the continent.
Join curator María Pavéz Carvajal as she explains the meaning behind the work of art and the many creative murals that have been created in Concepción.

#87 The Lo Abarca Sanctuary

Explore the Lo Abarca church — known equally for its turbulent history surviving earthquakes and the beautiful religious art inside — in the company of Sister Brígida.

#86 Marine Conservation

Join marine biologist Alejandro Pérez Matus on a tour of one marine reserve and discover how conservationists are protecting the country’s rich and diverse sea life.

#85 Animal Pathology Exhibit

Complete with a cyclops and a two headed calf, the animal pathology exhibit at the Universidad Austral in Valdivia hosts a world of the weird and unexpected found nowhere else. Follow veterinarian María José Navarrete as she guides us through the exhibit, explaining the stories behind each of the creatures housed in this fascinating museum.

#84 Sound Check in Teatro Municipal

Go behind the scenes in Santiago’s famed Teatro Municipal with sound engineer Chalo Gonzalez as he prepares the stage for a rock concert. From the building’s acoustics to tricks of the trade, Gonzalez shares an inside view of just what goes into a dazzling performance.

#83 Chilean Gold Miners

Venture underground into a Chilean goldmine and learn the secrets of the trade. You never know, you might just strike gold yourself!

#82 Ski Cross

On the slopes of El Colorado, just a short drive from Chile’s capital, young athletes are learning how to jump, land, and speed their way to the finish line in the sport of ski cross. Coach José Antonio Santiagos shares with us what it takes to be a top ski racer, and even shares some tips on how to shave a couple seconds off your time. Do you have what it takes to be a ski cross champion?

#81 Ultramarathoner

Only a few years ago Matías Anguita was a heavy smoker with an office job. Today, he has become a record breaking ultramarathoner, running extreme distances throughout Chile. Join him as he explains his passion for this extreme sport and explains his new challenge: running the length of Chile from north to south.

#80 The Virgin of Andacollo

In a small town outside of La Serena, Christmas is far more than a holiday. In Andacollo, the celebration is a mix of religion, tradition, and local lore, drawing in visitors from all over Chile and beyond to its main church. At the center of all this is the Virgin of Andacollo, whose story is one of survival and rediscovery.

#79 Taxidermy in Santiago’s Natural History Museum

Go behind the scenes of Santiago’s Natural History Museum and discover how the impressive life-like figures of animals that line its halls and fill its exhibition cases were created. Ricardo Vergara, the taxidermist for the museum, shows us how he puts the puzzle together to bring these creatures back to life.

#78 Skyscrapers

The Costanera Center has become an unmistakable icon in the capital’s skyline. Standing at 300 meters, it is the tallest building in South America! Go inside and discover the science, and magic, behind its monumental construction in the latest from LivingAtlasChile.

#77 School Marching Band

What does Chile sound like? Have a listen to one of the many school bands taking music into the classrooms and lives of the country’s youth. With drums, trumpets, and even some cymbals, this marching band brings the music to life.

#76 Canyoning in Futaleufu

“We are at the end of the world and the water is always colder because we’re a couple of meters from the mountain range where the snow thaws” says Vanessa Oyarzo as she shares with us the extreme sport of canyoning. As she takes us down a waterfall, Oyarzo tells us the secrets of this outdoor sport, including how to keep from slipping.

#75 Cerro Sombrero

Founded in the late 1950s with the aim to provide housing for the families of oil workers, Cerro Sombrero is a town suspended in time. Cinemas, sports centers and houses built in a US style are still occupied by almost 700 inhabitants, residing in this far-flung corner of Southern Chile, Tierra del Fuego. “Everything still works as it did on the first day,” says Ricardo Olea, former mayor of the town.

#74 Walkways in Chilean Patagonia

Many people come to Caleta Tortel, deep in chilean Patagonia, thinking of fish and seafood. Once they arrive they discover much more: the magic of this lumber town relays on an intricate walkway system, which leads to a unique culture described gracefully by Eduardo Velázquez, local poet.

#73 Ancient rock art

Hidden away in Cerro Castillo are some works of art that could be over 7,000 years old! Hundreds of hands painted by the native Pehuenche hunters and gatherers.

#72 Chilotes and Germans

A cute hamlet tucked away in Chilean Patagonia, Puyuhuapi was born out of the hard work and cooperation between two very different cultures—Germans and Chilotes.

#71 Artisanal Pisco

If you have visited Chile, you no doubt tried pisco in some form, a Pisco Sour, Piscola perhaps? Get a behind the scenes look at how this delicious drink is made, from vine to glass!

#70 Flying over Patagonia

Patagonia- a stunning pristine landscape of forests, mountains, glaciers, rivers and lakes. Although there is no wrong way to explore this beautiful area, perhaps one of the best ways? By air! Go flying with Hugo Rozas and get a unique perspective of this fantastic part of Chile and learn the tricks of navigating the skies of this unique area.

#69 Medicinal herbs

“It is something inexplicable, a connection between nature and ourselves,” explains Bernardita Igor Marileo, an expert in traditional Mapuche medicines.

#68 Sketch artist

Mauricio Vargas, Police Sergeant and sketch artist tried to help by walking the victims through their memories, piecing it together into a sketch that can then be used to catch the criminals or find missing loved ones.

#67 Artisanal sausages

Luis Munzenmayer walks us through the process of making the delicious offerings at his artisan butchery, from seasoning to sale.

#66 Restorán Bus

This is not your average roadside diner, made from recycled regional buses, Restorán Bus in Patagonia serves up delicious sandwiches and meals in a little piece of history.

#65 Hidden Barbeque

As we watch the master at work we learn how he stumbled upon this ingenious method of slow cooking that has our mouths watering.

#64 Laura Vicuña sanctuary

Inés Bugueño shares the story of how this young girl became the center of this place and how her memory has grown into a following.

#63 Volcanic aftermath in Chaitén

In 2008 the Chaitén volcano erupted after laying dormant for over 9,000 years, sending ash, smoke, and lava flowing into the little town named for the roaring mountain.

#62 Family Cemetary

Take a walk through one family’s history as we join Tito Berrocal in his traditional family cemetery. “We all end up in the same place,” Tito tells us as he shares the stories of the various people who left their mark on this life and the legacy of his family name.

#61 Tabas

“To make a taba is really a science” says Rómulo, who takes us through the process of making the central piece in the popular traditional game perfected by Southern Chile’s weather-worn ranch workers.

#60 Bike Riding School

Healthy hearts, minds, and communities are becoming more and more common as cycling gains popularity across Chile.

#59 Cantate of Aysén

The history of Chile comes alive through song thanks to Arturo Barros. The chorus director of Tierra Viva turns his region’s history into dramatic folkloric song, historic poetry set to music.

#58 Combarbalita

The combarbalita stone is a mix of desert colors and unique to the Combarala zone and the source of inspiration for these artisans. Follow Juan Frívola into the mines and the artisan shop to see how they create beautiful crafts by hand every step of the way.

#57 Chile’s Fútbol Calle Team

For the players and leaders of Chile’s Fútbol Calle, or Street Soccer, winning means more than just scoring goals, it means changing lives. As Germán Rubilar, coach and former player with Fútbol Calle, says, “The biggest benefit is to have a way to spread your wings and play.”

#56 Huemules in Chilean Patagonia

The search for the elusive and endangered huemul takes us to the beautiful Parque Patagonia in Cochrane in Chile’s extreme south. Daniel Velázquez, a park ranger and native of the area, invites us along as he tracks a female and explains what makes this Andean deer so special, and why protecting them is more important than ever.

#55 Porcelanatron

Think you have seen it all? Check out what Jorge Cabieses, a visual artist in Chile, has created! The “Porcelanatron” is a musical instrument made with porcelain figurines (yes, those slightly outdated figurines that decorate your grandmother’s house), whose sound is unique and unsettling.

His fascination with these small sculptures, with their silent aesthetics of dubious taste, has led him to carry out all kinds of artistic experiments with them. ” The mix is very odd and very attractive,” he says, while tapping the models with a spoon, “But I would never have one of these in my house.”

#54 Tololo Astronomical Observatory

The stars have captured imaginations for as long as man has been looking at the night sky. Chile’s northern region is home to some of the darkest, clearest night skies, making it an ideal place for stellar observation. We take you to Cerro Tololo Observatory, nestled in the Elqui Valley and beneath the center of the Milky Way Galaxy. Here international researchers are uncovering the secrets of the universe including the biggest and most fundamental question, how did it all begin?

#53 Marigolds and sustainable agriculture in the Chilean desert

“It was a gift of the area,” Danitza Bugueño says of her field of marigold flowers. She moved to the Limarí Valley with the goal of working sustainably with the land and taking advantage of Northern Chile’s abundance of sun. Originally she started planting marigolds as a natural pest control, and soon found they flourished in the harsh environment. Now she focuses on the sunny flower, harnessing its many therapeutic and cosmetic applications, making a sustainable business through sustainable practices in an unlikely location.

#52 Handmade rugs in Chilean Patagonia

The beautiful artisan rugs produced in Puyuhuapi, Chile, are part of a rich heritage dating back to the first German settlers to found the town in the 1930′s. Today, everything is still done by hand, making each piece unique and special. We take you through the workshop where you can see the intricate process and the women who turn wool into gold. Perfection, as designer Verónica Ralph explains, is reached through work done with genuine love.

#51 Artisan and collector of buses

Ever since he was a child, Darguin Cortés has been passionate about Chile’s buses. “Everyone thought I was crazy,” he confesses. When he was young playing with his friends in the neighborhood, he would count the buses that passed, thinking of their routes, where they would be coming from and heading to, drawing them and remembering each one.

First Season
#1 3201 miles across Chile

Longer than the journey between Lisbon and Moscow, or the trip from Seattle to Miami, this epic journey straps a camera on the bumper of a car that travels the entire length of Chile. Beginning in the deserts of Arica in the North, the car traverses diverse terrain and finally ends in Punta Arenas, one of the southernmost cities in the world. The most amazing part: this journey takes only 10 minutes!

#2 Fog Catchers in Atacama Desert

Trying to find water in the Atacama Desert, the driest place on earth, can be a big problem. The village Falda Verde has a solution: a system of netting that collects drops of water from fog, known locally as la camanchaca.

#3 The Spirit of Surfing

The ocean is a permanent part of the scenery in Chile, a country with 4,300 km of coastline. The quality of the waves and the area’s excellent climate have created ideal locations for surfing, including Chinchorro beach in Arica.

In this ample maritme area, Arica offers permanent strong winds, that generate short, tubular waves perfect for both children and adults to enjoy on their surfboards. Santiago and Felipe Pacheco can attest to that.

#4 Kite Flying in Valparaiso

Kite flying is a traditional activity in Chile. The practice is especially popular in September, when excellent weather conditions coincide with celebrations for Chilean Independence Day.

The tradition is so popular, that in September, they say that the skies “collapse” with kites. All professional competitions must be put off until October. Boris Prado is an expert in the art of kite flying.

#5 28 Hours of Piano

Thirty-two Chilean pianists gathered in the lobby of the Museo de Bellas Artes in Santiago to fully perform the work Vexations by French composer Erick Satie.

#6 Library Boat in the Chiloé Archipelago

Once a month, Teolinda visits the Chiloé archipelago’s most remote villages in a “bibliolancha”, or library boat, to lend books. Among the community’s favorites are novels and manuals on natural medicine.

#7 Weavers on the Isles of Chiloé

In 1996, Marcia Mancilla, the designer from Chiloé, decided to try to save the textile traditions of the island – but with an eye on design. After a tough search for weavers who still worked with looms, Mancilla founded Kelgwo, a store that creates scarves, vests, and ponchos using all-natural materials.

#8 Pre-Columbian Tinkus Dance in Iquique

At Colegio España, in the capital of Chile’s Tarapacá Region, the children of the area learn ancestral traditions like the Tinku dance, meaning “meeting” in Quechua. Typical of folk dancing in Bolivia, this ceremonial dance is practiced in religious celebrations like La Tirana and San Lorenzo. The dance represents a sacrifice for la Pachamama (Mother Earth), the most important deity of pre-Columbian cultures.

#9 Greyhound Races

Adrenaline, speed and excitement are the emotions experienced in the few seconds of a greyhound race. This Chilean tradition brings together hundreds of people on Sundays and holidays.

#10 Flowering Desert in Chile’s North

Every spring, if conditions permit, the Atacama Desert blooms. This phenomenon paints the driest place on the planet with incredible colors for two months.

#11 Memories of Salitre in the Atacama Desert

In order to share the history of Chile’s nitrate fields, every Sunday María Moscoso Dávalos holds a trip down memory lane through the radio program “Iquique, la pampa and its history.”

In each episode, the show remembers the golden age of the region that thrived between 1830 and 1930, when nitrate was a major factor in the Chilean economy and the nitrate boom was in full swing.

#12 The Magic Pen

Teacher José Terrazas has improved care, participation and even the grades of his students at the Leonardo da Vinci school in the city of Arica, thanks to a new invention called “magic pencil”.

The device mimics the function of an interactive whiteboard, but at a low cost, since the design consists of an infrared pen, a Nintendo Wii video game control console, a projector and a laptop.

#13 A Multicultural feast in Northern Chile

In the town of Belén in northern Chile’s Norte Grande, a special intercultural banquette is celebrated. A group of women prepare different traditional dishes from the Altiplano, including characteristic meals from Perú and Bolivia. The whole town gets together to enjoy them.

#14 Roadside Shrines Throughout Chile

“Animitas” or roadside shrines are popular religious expressions that can be seen along highways throughout Chile. Where someone dies tragically, a group of people—not necessarily family members—construct small sanctuaries where the spirit of the deceased is venerated and asked for favors.

#15 Boxing School

“Boxing is technique, not brutality,” said Eduardo “Wonder” Prieto, historic athlete of Iquique in northern Chile.

#16 Solar Car Race in the Atacama Desert

In the Atacama Desert in northern Chile, ​​an unconventional car race has been created: all of its contestants are propelled only by solar energy. Being the driest place in the world and thanks to the Atacama’s 320 days of radient sunshine a year, it was ideal for the first competition of its kind in Latin America.

Unlike other solar races, the Atacama Solar Challenge has many slopes, making vehicle movement more challenging.

#17 Television School in Chiloé

As part of their school work, a group of students from Chiloé produce TV programs that are transmitted throughout the community.

#18 Paragliding in Chile’s south

On the Calfuco beach, off the coast of Valdivia, Martín Schwarzenberg practices paragliding, a sport that was created in the late twentieth century as the quickest way down from the top of a mountain.

#19 Electronic duo at the ends of the earth

From Punta Arenas, on the extreme southern edges of the American continent, Rafael Cheuquelaf and Héctor Aguilar compose electronic music inspired by the grey landscapes of the Magellan Region. Together they are Lluvia Ácida (Acid Rain), founded in 1996. Since their beginning, the pair has released 16 albums. They have also played at Chile’s Presidente Eduardo Frei Montalva Antarctic base.

#20 Cargo Container Theater Festival in Valparaíso

Seeing the need to unite the rich cultural and commercial life of the port of Valparaíso, Nicolás Eyzaguirre decided to utilize shipping containers to put on performances, since they are a versatile spaces as well as representative of the city.

#21 The classic railway from Talca to Constitución

Between these two southern cities, a train route still remains active, known as “Ramal Talca-Constitución.” This traditional form of transportation passes through many towns that are otherwise inaccessible.

#22 Breakdancing in Valdivia

From the African American communities of New York City neighborhoods like the Bronx and Brooklyn, breakdancing or B-boying came to the south of Chile.

In Valdivia, the capital of the Los Rios Region, a group of young people gather in the city center to practice breakdancing, a style of dance that has won them several international championships.

#23 Replica of Magellan’s Ship, The Nao Victoria

A replica of the Spanish ship La Victoria sits grounded in Punta Arenas. La Victoria was the first boat to successfully circumnavigate the globe and the one in which captain Ferdinand Magellan first spotted what are now Chilean territories. The boat was constructed by a group of ship owners from Punta Arenas, and today functions as a museum.

#24 Bird Hospital in Central Chile

In the Chilean countryside, birds of prey play a fundamental role in the control of pests, especially rodents. But not everyone knows that. Many hawks, owls and eagles are injured directly or indirectly by human action.

Concerned about this situation, a group of Chilean veterinarians organized a rehabilitation center 20 years ago for birds of prey in Talagante, a town on the outskirts of Santiago. Here birds are kept and treated before being released.

#25 Cheesemaking with Normande Cows

In the community of Curacautín in the Araucanía Region of southern Chile, María Mardones makes artisanal cheeses from the milk of Normande cattle. Normande cattle are native to France and produce up to 27 liters of milk twice a day. The milk of this kind of cow is especially suited to the production of cheeses and creams because of the properties of its proteins. In addition, the cheeses produced by María Mardones are free of preservatives and chemical additives.

#26 Cemetery in Punta Arenas

This cemetery is a main attraction in Punta Arenas, one of the farthest southern cities in the world. Discover this place through the narration of Mario Moreno, a local historian.

#27 Geoglyphic Art in the Atacama Desert

El Salar de Pintados is the site of Chile’s oldest geoglyphs. However, no concrete information exists about the subject. Some have speculated that they served as signals for extraterrestrial beings. The most accepted explanation is that they were used as guides for the large caravans that traveled from the Altiplano (the High Plateau) through the Pampa del Tamarugal.

#28 Fly Fishing in Araucania Region

In Cherquenco in the Araucanía Region, Reinaldo Pérez practices fly-fishing. Using an artificial lure, Reinaldo attracts trout throughout many of the numerous rivers and lakes in southern Chile, a geography that proves perfect for this activity.

#29 Chainsaw Sculpture in Southern Chile

Near the slopes of the Volcán Llaima, Osvaldo Ovalle recreates animals and human figures out of wood from fallen trees.

#30 Sawmill in Tierra del Fuego

Puerto Yartou, in the extreme south of Chilean Patagonia, is the site of Tierra del Fuego’s largest sawmill. Discover its history in the following Living Atlas Chile video.

#31 Airbrushing lowriders in Tarapacá

Inspired by the archeology and the fauna of Chile’s Norte Grande, a young artist from Iquique uses the hoods of cars as his canvas.

#32 The Rival Rowers of Chile’s Southern River City

Thanks to the good conditions of the Río Calle-Calle and inclement weather – which builds character, according to the athletes – more than 85% of the successful Chilean rowers train in the waters of the city of Valdivia.

#33 Prehistoric Remains on the isles of Chiloé

Sixto González and his brothers continue to administrate and enriche the legacy that their father left them. González’s father, Don Serafín, founded the Museo Puente Quilo about 20 kilometers from Ancud on Chiloé’s Isla Grande. Don Serafín started the museum in 1988 when he discovered archeological remains in the patio of his house. Today the family has a strange collection of animal remains, including two complete sperm whale skeletons, stone tools used by the Huilliche people, and fossils.

#34 Archeology in Atacama Desert

Self-taught archaeologist Mauricio Hidalgo investigates the origins of a town in northern Chile.

#35 Prosciutto in Chile’s Southern Araucanía Region

In southern Chile, a small Italian community founded in the early twentieth century prepares traditional prosciutto from Tuscany – but with the special flavor of the lands of the Araucanía Region.

#36 Terrace Farming in a Northern Village

Cecila Colamar lives in the town of Caspana, located more than 3,200 meters above sea level and 100 kilometers north of San Pedro de Atacama, within the sides of a deep ravine. There, locals cultivate food in the same way as the ancient pre-Hispanic communities who inhabited the area.

#37 Mapudungún Language Classes in the Southern Chile

Concerned that use of the Mapudungún language had become increasingly infrequent, José Gregorio Blanco Painequeo began teaching the Mapuche language to children in the Rupangue community in the Araucanía Region.

#38 Restoration of Churches in Northern Chile

In the village of Guañacagua, in northern Chile, a group of architects is reconstructing a sixteenth century church that was damaged by the earthquake that struck the area in 2005. However, the team has taken great care to use the building’s original construction techniques in order to maintain the style of the historic structure.

#39 Buggies in the Atacama Desert

In one of the most inhospitable parts of the Atacama Desert in northern Chile, an Argentine and a Chilean have opened new tourist routes in an all-terrain buggy.

#40 Shipyards in Iquique

Shipyards are places for ships to be built, repaired and transformed, using impressive technology, order, and craft. One of these shipyards is Marco Chilena, located in Iquique, in northern Chile.

#41 Chumbeques, a Tasty Treat in Iquique

The most Iquiquean of Chilean sweets has a Chinese father and a Chilean mother. Made with flour, butter and honey, the chumbeque is the creation of Chinese immigrant Koupolin Koo Kau and his wife, the Chilean baker Petronila Bustillos Sandoval.

#42 Pizarro Signs

Before industrial billboard companies existed, there were men who dedicated themselves to creating signs all by hand. Manuel Pizarro of Antofagasta is one of them.

#43 Don Checo Museum in Chiloé

Located 1,000 kilometers south of Santiago, the archipelago of Chiloé serves as the northern gate to Chilean Patagonia, and is comprised of nearly 40 islands. One of these is Mechuque, upon which visitors will find the Museo Don Checo, a museum that guards a mystery that’s hard to uncover.

#44 Livestock Auction

At the markets in the town of Victoria in the Araucanía Region, the tranquil lifestyle of Chilean countrymen meets the feverish rhythm of the market’s auctioneers.

#45 Mapmaking in Patagonia

Bruce Willet is a cartographer from Connecticut, U.S.A. Today he travels through Patagonia and the Magallanes on foot and by bicycle making maps. Settled in Punta Arenas, Willet says there is much to do in the area: collecting data, updating old maps, and making high-quality geographic information more available for both locals and visitors.

#46 Beavers in Tierra del Fuego

In 1946, fifty beavers were taken to Tierra del Fuego, the extreme southern edges of South America, in order to develop a fur industry. Unfortunately today they have become a plague; the population of these semi-aquatic rodents originating in North America has extended across the whole island. They fell the beech forests and construct dams that transform the ecosystem of the area.

#48 The Llaima Volcano Geopark in Southern Chile

National Park Conguillío is located the Araucanía Region of southern Chile. Native flora and fauna are contained within its boarders and 200 million years of geological history can be traced within its Volcán Llaima, one of South America’s most active volcanoes.

#49 Ferry Rides in Patagonia

El Evangelistas is a ferry that navigates through the canals and cliff sides of Patagonia. Here the Chilean territory divides into thousands of islands that sink into the southern oceans and extend until the extreme southern territories of the American continent. Glaciers and thousand-year-old virgin forests adorn this wilderness of southern Chile.

#50 The Writers’ Archive of Chile’s National Library

Pedro Pablo Zegers is in charge of the Archive of the Writer at the National Library of Chile, a department responsible for preserving the original manuscripts of Chilean authors like Gabriela Mistral and Pablo Neruda.

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#100 The Carretera Austral in 10 minutes

Take a journey with us down Chile’s famous Carretera Austral. This stunning road trip is 770 miles long, passing through beautiful forest, quaint villages, and untouched landscapes on its route from Puerto Montt to Villa O’Higgins at the edge of Chilean Patagonia.

#99 Villa Lucia in Cartagena

The seaside resort of Cartagena has hosted various artists and among them one made a little architectural jewel: Villa Lucia is a miniature replica of a Tuscan villa in the central coast. Commissioned by Italian immigrants, the painter and writer Adolfo Couve rescued it from oblivion and spent his last years in this mansion.

#98 Organ

“In Chile there are approximately 120 organs in total including the smaller ones.However, there are only a few like this, with three keyboards and this many tubes,” explains Christian Sundt, organist at the historical Saint Paul’s Church in Valparaíso. The church’s organ dates back to 1903, designed specifically for the ornate space. Discover the craftsmanship that goes into creating this massive instrument, and the skills it takes to make it sing.

#97 Luthiers

“Each instrument brings a surprise,” says artisan luthier Máximo López. Touring his workshop we find all different kinds of instruments, hand made from carefully selected wood. Fascinated by music and instruments since he was a child, López has accumulated a talent and a vast collection. A lover of the art and the music, he cares for each of his creations. ”I guess if you asked me which is my favorite, I’d have to say I still haven’t decided,” López admits.

#96 Galleries

“The center of Santiago is unique honestly because it contains these quality urban spaces with amenities that mean you can stay and spend time here, relaxed,” says architect José Rosas.
Rosas takes us through the galleries designed especially for the Chilean capital, walking us through their history and explaing what role they play in this bustling metropolis.

#95 Absinthe – Living Atlas Chile

“At one point, absinthe used to have something of a black legend about it, that it led to insanity, to ‘absinthism,’” says master distiller Eric Caballero.
So what goes into this legendary brew? Find out the myths and facts behind this famous concoction and how indigenous traditions have made this drink especially Chilean.

#94 River neighborhood

In the picturesque riverside city of Valdivia, architects are getting creative- desiging floating neighborhoods that are both environmentally friendly, convenient, and fun! Discover how these ingenius individuals are avoiding the traffic and bustle of the city through innovative tecniques and a love of the river that defines the city.

#93 Magic

“What we dedicate ourselves to is illusionism, creating a different reality in the minds of these people,” says magician Mirko Peric.
Learn his tricks and those of his fellow magicians in the Magic Circle of Concepción and why they are drawn to this creative and entertaining passed time.

#92 Apitherapy

Bees are known to be an intricate and incredibly important part of our world, but did you know they could also have the power to heal us? One of the first practitioners of apitherapy in Chile, Nelson explains how the sting of a bee can actually have healing properties for humans.
“Theoretically they could be used to treat everything… if it’s employed early on, it cures,” Correa says.

#91 The Vicaría de Solidaridad

Created by Cardinal Raúl Silva Henríquez, the Vicaría de Solidaridad monitored human rights issues and provided support for victims of violence for almost twenty years. ”Our job is focused on collaborating in the process of truth, justice, reparation and reconciliation,” says María Paz Vergara, thee foundation’s executive secretary for the documentation and archives of the Vicaría de la Solidaridad. Today their research and the database they collected remains a key resource for many trials dating back to the 70s and 80s.
Explore the archives of this monument for human rights work with the latest from Living Atlas Chile.

#90 Port of San Antonio

Go inside one of Chile’s largest ports – the port of San Antonio – which has been connecting Chile to the world since 1911. A marvel of industry and technology, workers here move thousands of shipments in and out of the port each week. Learn how they do it and discover the history of this important gateway.

#89 Adobe

Many of the timeless homes and estates in Chile were constructed out of hand-crafted adobe bricks. The recipe for this traditional material requires the perfect balance of clay, straw, and know-how. Follow master adobe maker José Sepúlveda and learn the secrets behind this classic building block.

#88 Mural of Latin America at the Universidad de Concepción

A gift of the Mexican government in the 1960s, the famous artist Jorge González Camarena created this remarkable mural recounting the unity between Latin American peoples and cultures across the long history of the continent.
Join curator María Pavéz Carvajal as she explains the meaning behind the work of art and the many creative murals that have been created in Concepción.

#87 The Lo Abarca Sanctuary

Explore the Lo Abarca church — known equally for its turbulent history surviving earthquakes and the beautiful religious art inside — in the company of Sister Brígida.

#86 Marine Conservation

Join marine biologist Alejandro Pérez Matus on a tour of one marine reserve and discover how conservationists are protecting the country’s rich and diverse sea life.

#85 Animal Pathology Exhibit

Complete with a cyclops and a two headed calf, the animal pathology exhibit at the Universidad Austral in Valdivia hosts a world of the weird and unexpected found nowhere else. Follow veterinarian María José Navarrete as she guides us through the exhibit, explaining the stories behind each of the creatures housed in this fascinating museum.

#84 Sound Check in Teatro Municipal

Go behind the scenes in Santiago’s famed Teatro Municipal with sound engineer Chalo Gonzalez as he prepares the stage for a rock concert. From the building’s acoustics to tricks of the trade, Gonzalez shares an inside view of just what goes into a dazzling performance.

#83 Chilean Gold Miners

Venture underground into a Chilean goldmine and learn the secrets of the trade. You never know, you might just strike gold yourself!

#82 Ski Cross

On the slopes of El Colorado, just a short drive from Chile’s capital, young athletes are learning how to jump, land, and speed their way to the finish line in the sport of ski cross. Coach José Antonio Santiagos shares with us what it takes to be a top ski racer, and even shares some tips on how to shave a couple seconds off your time. Do you have what it takes to be a ski cross champion?

#81 Ultramarathoner

Only a few years ago Matías Anguita was a heavy smoker with an office job. Today, he has become a record breaking ultramarathoner, running extreme distances throughout Chile. Join him as he explains his passion for this extreme sport and explains his new challenge: running the length of Chile from north to south.

#80 The Virgin of Andacollo

In a small town outside of La Serena, Christmas is far more than a holiday. In Andacollo, the celebration is a mix of religion, tradition, and local lore, drawing in visitors from all over Chile and beyond to its main church. At the center of all this is the Virgin of Andacollo, whose story is one of survival and rediscovery.

#79 Taxidermy in Santiago’s Natural History Museum

Go behind the scenes of Santiago’s Natural History Museum and discover how the impressive life-like figures of animals that line its halls and fill its exhibition cases were created. Ricardo Vergara, the taxidermist for the museum, shows us how he puts the puzzle together to bring these creatures back to life.

#78 Skyscrapers

The Costanera Center has become an unmistakable icon in the capital’s skyline. Standing at 300 meters, it is the tallest building in South America! Go inside and discover the science, and magic, behind its monumental construction in the latest from LivingAtlasChile.

#77 School Marching Band

What does Chile sound like? Have a listen to one of the many school bands taking music into the classrooms and lives of the country’s youth. With drums, trumpets, and even some cymbals, this marching band brings the music to life.

#76 Canyoning in Futaleufu

“We are at the end of the world and the water is always colder because we’re a couple of meters from the mountain range where the snow thaws” says Vanessa Oyarzo as she shares with us the extreme sport of canyoning. As she takes us down a waterfall, Oyarzo tells us the secrets of this outdoor sport, including how to keep from slipping.

#75 Cerro Sombrero

Founded in the late 1950s with the aim to provide housing for the families of oil workers, Cerro Sombrero is a town suspended in time. Cinemas, sports centers and houses built in a US style are still occupied by almost 700 inhabitants, residing in this far-flung corner of Southern Chile, Tierra del Fuego. “Everything still works as it did on the first day,” says Ricardo Olea, former mayor of the town.

#74 Walkways in Chilean Patagonia

Many people come to Caleta Tortel, deep in chilean Patagonia, thinking of fish and seafood. Once they arrive they discover much more: the magic of this lumber town relays on an intricate walkway system, which leads to a unique culture described gracefully by Eduardo Velázquez, local poet.

#73 Ancient rock art

Hidden away in Cerro Castillo are some works of art that could be over 7,000 years old! Hundreds of hands painted by the native Pehuenche hunters and gatherers.

#72 Chilotes and Germans

A cute hamlet tucked away in Chilean Patagonia, Puyuhuapi was born out of the hard work and cooperation between two very different cultures—Germans and Chilotes.

#71 Artisanal Pisco

If you have visited Chile, you no doubt tried pisco in some form, a Pisco Sour, Piscola perhaps? Get a behind the scenes look at how this delicious drink is made, from vine to glass!

#70 Flying over Patagonia

Patagonia- a stunning pristine landscape of forests, mountains, glaciers, rivers and lakes. Although there is no wrong way to explore this beautiful area, perhaps one of the best ways? By air! Go flying with Hugo Rozas and get a unique perspective of this fantastic part of Chile and learn the tricks of navigating the skies of this unique area.

#69 Medicinal herbs

“It is something inexplicable, a connection between nature and ourselves,” explains Bernardita Igor Marileo, an expert in traditional Mapuche medicines.

#68 Sketch artist

Mauricio Vargas, Police Sergeant and sketch artist tried to help by walking the victims through their memories, piecing it together into a sketch that can then be used to catch the criminals or find missing loved ones.

#67 Artisanal sausages

Luis Munzenmayer walks us through the process of making the delicious offerings at his artisan butchery, from seasoning to sale.

#66 Restorán Bus

This is not your average roadside diner, made from recycled regional buses, Restorán Bus in Patagonia serves up delicious sandwiches and meals in a little piece of history.

#65 Hidden Barbeque

As we watch the master at work we learn how he stumbled upon this ingenious method of slow cooking that has our mouths watering.

#64 Laura Vicuña sanctuary

Inés Bugueño shares the story of how this young girl became the center of this place and how her memory has grown into a following.

#63 Volcanic aftermath in Chaitén

In 2008 the Chaitén volcano erupted after laying dormant for over 9,000 years, sending ash, smoke, and lava flowing into the little town named for the roaring mountain.

#62 Family Cemetary

Take a walk through one family’s history as we join Tito Berrocal in his traditional family cemetery. “We all end up in the same place,” Tito tells us as he shares the stories of the various people who left their mark on this life and the legacy of his family name.

#61 Tabas

“To make a taba is really a science” says Rómulo, who takes us through the process of making the central piece in the popular traditional game perfected by Southern Chile’s weather-worn ranch workers.

#60 Bike Riding School

Healthy hearts, minds, and communities are becoming more and more common as cycling gains popularity across Chile.

#59 Cantate of Aysén

The history of Chile comes alive through song thanks to Arturo Barros. The chorus director of Tierra Viva turns his region’s history into dramatic folkloric song, historic poetry set to music.

#58 Combarbalita

The combarbalita stone is a mix of desert colors and unique to the Combarala zone and the source of inspiration for these artisans. Follow Juan Frívola into the mines and the artisan shop to see how they create beautiful crafts by hand every step of the way.

#57 Chile’s Fútbol Calle Team

For the players and leaders of Chile’s Fútbol Calle, or Street Soccer, winning means more than just scoring goals, it means changing lives. As Germán Rubilar, coach and former player with Fútbol Calle, says, “The biggest benefit is to have a way to spread your wings and play.”

#56 Huemules in Chilean Patagonia

The search for the elusive and endangered huemul takes us to the beautiful Parque Patagonia in Cochrane in Chile’s extreme south. Daniel Velázquez, a park ranger and native of the area, invites us along as he tracks a female and explains what makes this Andean deer so special, and why protecting them is more important than ever.

#55 Porcelanatron

Think you have seen it all? Check out what Jorge Cabieses, a visual artist in Chile, has created! The “Porcelanatron” is a musical instrument made with porcelain figurines (yes, those slightly outdated figurines that decorate your grandmother’s house), whose sound is unique and unsettling.

His fascination with these small sculptures, with their silent aesthetics of dubious taste, has led him to carry out all kinds of artistic experiments with them. ” The mix is very odd and very attractive,” he says, while tapping the models with a spoon, “But I would never have one of these in my house.”

#54 Tololo Astronomical Observatory

The stars have captured imaginations for as long as man has been looking at the night sky. Chile’s northern region is home to some of the darkest, clearest night skies, making it an ideal place for stellar observation. We take you to Cerro Tololo Observatory, nestled in the Elqui Valley and beneath the center of the Milky Way Galaxy. Here international researchers are uncovering the secrets of the universe including the biggest and most fundamental question, how did it all begin?

#53 Marigolds and sustainable agriculture in the Chilean desert

“It was a gift of the area,” Danitza Bugueño says of her field of marigold flowers. She moved to the Limarí Valley with the goal of working sustainably with the land and taking advantage of Northern Chile’s abundance of sun. Originally she started planting marigolds as a natural pest control, and soon found they flourished in the harsh environment. Now she focuses on the sunny flower, harnessing its many therapeutic and cosmetic applications, making a sustainable business through sustainable practices in an unlikely location.

#52 Handmade rugs in Chilean Patagonia

The beautiful artisan rugs produced in Puyuhuapi, Chile, are part of a rich heritage dating back to the first German settlers to found the town in the 1930′s. Today, everything is still done by hand, making each piece unique and special. We take you through the workshop where you can see the intricate process and the women who turn wool into gold. Perfection, as designer Verónica Ralph explains, is reached through work done with genuine love.

#51 Artisan and collector of buses

Ever since he was a child, Darguin Cortés has been passionate about Chile’s buses. “Everyone thought I was crazy,” he confesses. When he was young playing with his friends in the neighborhood, he would count the buses that passed, thinking of their routes, where they would be coming from and heading to, drawing them and remembering each one.

#1 3201 miles across Chile

Longer than the journey between Lisbon and Moscow, or the trip from Seattle to Miami, this epic journey straps a camera on the bumper of a car that travels the entire length of Chile. Beginning in the deserts of Arica in the North, the car traverses diverse terrain and finally ends in Punta Arenas, one of the southernmost cities in the world. The most amazing part: this journey takes only 10 minutes!

#2 Fog Catchers in Atacama Desert

Trying to find water in the Atacama Desert, the driest place on earth, can be a big problem. The village Falda Verde has a solution: a system of netting that collects drops of water from fog, known locally as la camanchaca.

#3 The Spirit of Surfing

The ocean is a permanent part of the scenery in Chile, a country with 4,300 km of coastline. The quality of the waves and the area’s excellent climate have created ideal locations for surfing, including Chinchorro beach in Arica.

In this ample maritme area, Arica offers permanent strong winds, that generate short, tubular waves perfect for both children and adults to enjoy on their surfboards. Santiago and Felipe Pacheco can attest to that.

#4 Kite Flying in Valparaiso

Kite flying is a traditional activity in Chile. The practice is especially popular in September, when excellent weather conditions coincide with celebrations for Chilean Independence Day.

The tradition is so popular, that in September, they say that the skies “collapse” with kites. All professional competitions must be put off until October. Boris Prado is an expert in the art of kite flying.

#5 28 Hours of Piano

Thirty-two Chilean pianists gathered in the lobby of the Museo de Bellas Artes in Santiago to fully perform the work Vexations by French composer Erick Satie.

#6 Library Boat in the Chiloé Archipelago

Once a month, Teolinda visits the Chiloé archipelago’s most remote villages in a “bibliolancha”, or library boat, to lend books. Among the community’s favorites are novels and manuals on natural medicine.

#7 Weavers on the Isles of Chiloé

In 1996, Marcia Mancilla, the designer from Chiloé, decided to try to save the textile traditions of the island – but with an eye on design. After a tough search for weavers who still worked with looms, Mancilla founded Kelgwo, a store that creates scarves, vests, and ponchos using all-natural materials.

#8 Pre-Columbian Tinkus Dance in Iquique

At Colegio España, in the capital of Chile’s Tarapacá Region, the children of the area learn ancestral traditions like the Tinku dance, meaning “meeting” in Quechua. Typical of folk dancing in Bolivia, this ceremonial dance is practiced in religious celebrations like La Tirana and San Lorenzo. The dance represents a sacrifice for la Pachamama (Mother Earth), the most important deity of pre-Columbian cultures.

#9 Greyhound Races

Adrenaline, speed and excitement are the emotions experienced in the few seconds of a greyhound race. This Chilean tradition brings together hundreds of people on Sundays and holidays.

#10 Flowering Desert in Chile’s North

Every spring, if conditions permit, the Atacama Desert blooms. This phenomenon paints the driest place on the planet with incredible colors for two months.

#11 Memories of Salitre in the Atacama Desert

In order to share the history of Chile’s nitrate fields, every Sunday María Moscoso Dávalos holds a trip down memory lane through the radio program “Iquique, la pampa and its history.”

In each episode, the show remembers the golden age of the region that thrived between 1830 and 1930, when nitrate was a major factor in the Chilean economy and the nitrate boom was in full swing.

#12 The Magic Pen

Teacher José Terrazas has improved care, participation and even the grades of his students at the Leonardo da Vinci school in the city of Arica, thanks to a new invention called “magic pencil”.

The device mimics the function of an interactive whiteboard, but at a low cost, since the design consists of an infrared pen, a Nintendo Wii video game control console, a projector and a laptop.

#13 A Multicultural feast in Northern Chile

In the town of Belén in northern Chile’s Norte Grande, a special intercultural banquette is celebrated. A group of women prepare different traditional dishes from the Altiplano, including characteristic meals from Perú and Bolivia. The whole town gets together to enjoy them.

#14 Roadside Shrines Throughout Chile

“Animitas” or roadside shrines are popular religious expressions that can be seen along highways throughout Chile. Where someone dies tragically, a group of people—not necessarily family members—construct small sanctuaries where the spirit of the deceased is venerated and asked for favors.

#15 Boxing School

“Boxing is technique, not brutality,” said Eduardo “Wonder” Prieto, historic athlete of Iquique in northern Chile.

#16 Solar Car Race in the Atacama Desert

In the Atacama Desert in northern Chile, ​​an unconventional car race has been created: all of its contestants are propelled only by solar energy. Being the driest place in the world and thanks to the Atacama’s 320 days of radient sunshine a year, it was ideal for the first competition of its kind in Latin America.

Unlike other solar races, the Atacama Solar Challenge has many slopes, making vehicle movement more challenging.

#17 Television School in Chiloé

As part of their school work, a group of students from Chiloé produce TV programs that are transmitted throughout the community.

#18 Paragliding in Chile’s south

On the Calfuco beach, off the coast of Valdivia, Martín Schwarzenberg practices paragliding, a sport that was created in the late twentieth century as the quickest way down from the top of a mountain.

#19 Electronic duo at the ends of the earth

From Punta Arenas, on the extreme southern edges of the American continent, Rafael Cheuquelaf and Héctor Aguilar compose electronic music inspired by the grey landscapes of the Magellan Region. Together they are Lluvia Ácida (Acid Rain), founded in 1996. Since their beginning, the pair has released 16 albums. They have also played at Chile’s Presidente Eduardo Frei Montalva Antarctic base.

#20 Cargo Container Theater Festival in Valparaíso

Seeing the need to unite the rich cultural and commercial life of the port of Valparaíso, Nicolás Eyzaguirre decided to utilize shipping containers to put on performances, since they are a versatile spaces as well as representative of the city.

#21 The classic railway from Talca to Constitución

Between these two southern cities, a train route still remains active, known as “Ramal Talca-Constitución.” This traditional form of transportation passes through many towns that are otherwise inaccessible.

#22 Breakdancing in Valdivia

From the African American communities of New York City neighborhoods like the Bronx and Brooklyn, breakdancing or B-boying came to the south of Chile.

In Valdivia, the capital of the Los Rios Region, a group of young people gather in the city center to practice breakdancing, a style of dance that has won them several international championships.

#23 Replica of Magellan’s Ship, The Nao Victoria

A replica of the Spanish ship La Victoria sits grounded in Punta Arenas. La Victoria was the first boat to successfully circumnavigate the globe and the one in which captain Ferdinand Magellan first spotted what are now Chilean territories. The boat was constructed by a group of ship owners from Punta Arenas, and today functions as a museum.

#24 Bird Hospital in Central Chile

In the Chilean countryside, birds of prey play a fundamental role in the control of pests, especially rodents. But not everyone knows that. Many hawks, owls and eagles are injured directly or indirectly by human action.

Concerned about this situation, a group of Chilean veterinarians organized a rehabilitation center 20 years ago for birds of prey in Talagante, a town on the outskirts of Santiago. Here birds are kept and treated before being released.

#25 Cheesemaking with Normande Cows

In the community of Curacautín in the Araucanía Region of southern Chile, María Mardones makes artisanal cheeses from the milk of Normande cattle. Normande cattle are native to France and produce up to 27 liters of milk twice a day. The milk of this kind of cow is especially suited to the production of cheeses and creams because of the properties of its proteins. In addition, the cheeses produced by María Mardones are free of preservatives and chemical additives.

#26 Cemetery in Punta Arenas

This cemetery is a main attraction in Punta Arenas, one of the farthest southern cities in the world. Discover this place through the narration of Mario Moreno, a local historian.

#27 Geoglyphic Art in the Atacama Desert

El Salar de Pintados is the site of Chile’s oldest geoglyphs. However, no concrete information exists about the subject. Some have speculated that they served as signals for extraterrestrial beings. The most accepted explanation is that they were used as guides for the large caravans that traveled from the Altiplano (the High Plateau) through the Pampa del Tamarugal.

#28 Fly Fishing in Araucania Region

In Cherquenco in the Araucanía Region, Reinaldo Pérez practices fly-fishing. Using an artificial lure, Reinaldo attracts trout throughout many of the numerous rivers and lakes in southern Chile, a geography that proves perfect for this activity.

#29 Chainsaw Sculpture in Southern Chile

Near the slopes of the Volcán Llaima, Osvaldo Ovalle recreates animals and human figures out of wood from fallen trees.

#30 Sawmill in Tierra del Fuego

Puerto Yartou, in the extreme south of Chilean Patagonia, is the site of Tierra del Fuego’s largest sawmill. Discover its history in the following Living Atlas Chile video.

#31 Airbrushing lowriders in Tarapacá

Inspired by the archeology and the fauna of Chile’s Norte Grande, a young artist from Iquique uses the hoods of cars as his canvas.

#32 The Rival Rowers of Chile’s Southern River City

Thanks to the good conditions of the Río Calle-Calle and inclement weather – which builds character, according to the athletes – more than 85% of the successful Chilean rowers train in the waters of the city of Valdivia.

#33 Prehistoric Remains on the isles of Chiloé

Sixto González and his brothers continue to administrate and enriche the legacy that their father left them. González’s father, Don Serafín, founded the Museo Puente Quilo about 20 kilometers from Ancud on Chiloé’s Isla Grande. Don Serafín started the museum in 1988 when he discovered archeological remains in the patio of his house. Today the family has a strange collection of animal remains, including two complete sperm whale skeletons, stone tools used by the Huilliche people, and fossils.

#34 Archeology in Atacama Desert

Self-taught archaeologist Mauricio Hidalgo investigates the origins of a town in northern Chile.

#35 Prosciutto in Chile’s Southern Araucanía Region

In southern Chile, a small Italian community founded in the early twentieth century prepares traditional prosciutto from Tuscany – but with the special flavor of the lands of the Araucanía Region.

#36 Terrace Farming in a Northern Village

Cecila Colamar lives in the town of Caspana, located more than 3,200 meters above sea level and 100 kilometers north of San Pedro de Atacama, within the sides of a deep ravine. There, locals cultivate food in the same way as the ancient pre-Hispanic communities who inhabited the area.

#37 Mapudungún Language Classes in the Southern Chile

Concerned that use of the Mapudungún language had become increasingly infrequent, José Gregorio Blanco Painequeo began teaching the Mapuche language to children in the Rupangue community in the Araucanía Region.

#38 Restoration of Churches in Northern Chile

In the village of Guañacagua, in northern Chile, a group of architects is reconstructing a sixteenth century church that was damaged by the earthquake that struck the area in 2005. However, the team has taken great care to use the building’s original construction techniques in order to maintain the style of the historic structure.

#39 Buggies in the Atacama Desert

In one of the most inhospitable parts of the Atacama Desert in northern Chile, an Argentine and a Chilean have opened new tourist routes in an all-terrain buggy.

#40 Shipyards in Iquique

Shipyards are places for ships to be built, repaired and transformed, using impressive technology, order, and craft. One of these shipyards is Marco Chilena, located in Iquique, in northern Chile.

#41 Chumbeques, a Tasty Treat in Iquique

The most Iquiquean of Chilean sweets has a Chinese father and a Chilean mother. Made with flour, butter and honey, the chumbeque is the creation of Chinese immigrant Koupolin Koo Kau and his wife, the Chilean baker Petronila Bustillos Sandoval.

#42 Pizarro Signs

Before industrial billboard companies existed, there were men who dedicated themselves to creating signs all by hand. Manuel Pizarro of Antofagasta is one of them.

#43 Don Checo Museum in Chiloé

Located 1,000 kilometers south of Santiago, the archipelago of Chiloé serves as the northern gate to Chilean Patagonia, and is comprised of nearly 40 islands. One of these is Mechuque, upon which visitors will find the Museo Don Checo, a museum that guards a mystery that’s hard to uncover.

#44 Livestock Auction

At the markets in the town of Victoria in the Araucanía Region, the tranquil lifestyle of Chilean countrymen meets the feverish rhythm of the market’s auctioneers.

#45 Mapmaking in Patagonia

Bruce Willet is a cartographer from Connecticut, U.S.A. Today he travels through Patagonia and the Magallanes on foot and by bicycle making maps. Settled in Punta Arenas, Willet says there is much to do in the area: collecting data, updating old maps, and making high-quality geographic information more available for both locals and visitors.

#46 Beavers in Tierra del Fuego

In 1946, fifty beavers were taken to Tierra del Fuego, the extreme southern edges of South America, in order to develop a fur industry. Unfortunately today they have become a plague; the population of these semi-aquatic rodents originating in North America has extended across the whole island. They fell the beech forests and construct dams that transform the ecosystem of the area.

#48 The Llaima Volcano Geopark in Southern Chile

National Park Conguillío is located the Araucanía Region of southern Chile. Native flora and fauna are contained within its boarders and 200 million years of geological history can be traced within its Volcán Llaima, one of South America’s most active volcanoes.

#49 Ferry Rides in Patagonia

El Evangelistas is a ferry that navigates through the canals and cliff sides of Patagonia. Here the Chilean territory divides into thousands of islands that sink into the southern oceans and extend until the extreme southern territories of the American continent. Glaciers and thousand-year-old virgin forests adorn this wilderness of southern Chile.

#50 The Writers’ Archive of Chile’s National Library

Pedro Pablo Zegers is in charge of the Archive of the Writer at the National Library of Chile, a department responsible for preserving the original manuscripts of Chilean authors like Gabriela Mistral and Pablo Neruda.

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